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An Elk Hunter In Church

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An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby Swede » 11 30, 2019 •  [Post 1]

I go to church in Scappoose Oregon, a bedroom community near Portland. Portland and the surrounding cities are quite liberal by most standards.
Every year I take time off from my church duties, including teaching, to go elk hunting. I am the only one there that regularly goes hunting. Only one other person there ever goes, and it is rare for him.
When I come back someone inevitably, in good humor, offers me a visitors card. Shortly thereafter I am asked how the hunt went. After Sunday School and church, I am asked by numerous people including elderly ladies if I got a "deer". Some always forget what I went hunting for. It doesn't matter as I explain I was after elk and tell them of my success or the lack thereof. The people genuinely love me and know I feel the same about them. They are anxious to see me again, and to know how things went. Most have never hunted and have absolutely no interest in the sport. Still, they are rooting for me. They care far more for me than a deer and they know I love the outdoors and the chase.
Almost every one of these elderly church people vote. As a church member I am what they personally see and associate with hunting. Does anyone think it would be wise for me to show an "in your face" attitude of indifference to others? Mind you I could never do such a thing.
I will venture that there are many that frequent this or other forums that are the face of hunting for at least some people.
Every year I read posts about the foolish "antihunters", and those that appease others by being "politically correct." To me being politically correct is simply being sensitive to others, and I rarely run into a true antihunter. Some people on the forums make it out that it is us against all the rest. I tend to think more often it is just us against ourselves. Remember you are the face of hunting.
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby Lefty » 11 30, 2019 •  [Post 2]

We have a couple families in our congregation that hunting is a big part of their life,.. and mine,.. And yes we,.. including you Swede we end up being the face that represents hunters.

What I can say it becomes our job to convert the non believers,.. in killing and eating big game :lol:
Genesis 27;3
3 Now therefore take, I pray thee, thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field, and take me some venison; :D

Swede you need to change churches. I attend one of two other congregations ( called Wards) during hunting season. The one congregation a number of the ranchers range cows where I hunt,, hunting is just part of life
The other congregation Im almost afraid to go there. They pick on the elk hunters,.. Actually during hunting season 1/3 -1/2 of those in church are hunters.

The questions I get,.." He saw you up Dry Creek!" "Wheres your yeller dog?" or "Oh your wife didnt come up this weekend?" "Whose red truck was at your camp? " "See any wolf tracks?" "See any cows with blue ear tags?"

Swede I lived in Vancouver, in the early 90's. What was interesting the school where I was teaching, 55% were registered republicans
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby >>>---WW----> » 12 01, 2019 •  [Post 3]

As I looked around church this morning, I was thinking about Swede and how he was the only hunter in his congregation. Most of the people in our church are either hunters, ranchers, or outfitters. Even the preacher is an elk hunter.
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby 7mmfan » 12 01, 2019 •  [Post 4]

As hunters we absolutely need to represent ourselves as the face of the hunting population. I'm with you Swede, I rarely run into staunch anti hunters. People usually have no exposure to hunting and their only knowledge is assumptions or what they've read online or been told by others. Usually after a couple drinks and a thoughtful co conversation backed up by facts and data points, people walk away with an entirely different point of view. Case in point, my wife's cousin is vegan. Not an in your face, talks about it constantly vegan, but vegan none the less. One Christmas I was asked how hunting season went and proudly talked about the bull and buck I'd killed. She made a passing comment about how we would all be better off not eating meat at all, and how killing is cruel. Her, most of the extended family, and I ended up having an hour long talk about conservatiom and herd management, as well as my hunt plans, meat care and processing, and end goal of a freezer full of organic free range meat to feed my family with. Now her and her husband are champions of hunting, even though they're still vegan. Just took a well thought out discussion to turn them.
I hunt therefore I am. I fish therefore I lie.
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby Swede » 12 01, 2019 •  [Post 5]

7mm you understood my point completely, but in case someone missed it; I will mention that my post was not about church. I am retired and don't belong to any clubs. Where I interact significantly with people is mostly at church.
Wherever we go and meet people, and get to know them, we are recognized as hunters. Do we want people forming an opinion about hunters by observing us? Do you want them voting based on what they observe about our attitude and our concern for their interests? Think about that the next time someone says they refuse to be "politically correct". Being P.C. is about not being needlessly offensive. It has nothing to do with giving up our passion for hunting.
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby Lefty » 12 01, 2019 •  [Post 6]

Oregon is going to be tough sale.
As outdoors-man in an urban area even harder. Fewer and fewer people have less contact with great grandpas farm or outdoor lifestyle that includes the cycle of life.
Had a discussion a while back , Some easterners bought a ranch in Teton Valley Idaho and leased to a local rancher,... who put cows on it,... Then freaked out that the cows were going to be killed for their meat :roll:
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby Tigger » 12 02, 2019 •  [Post 7]

When I teach firearm safety class, I always tell the kids that camo (and blaze orange) is the hunter's uniform and we will be judged by your actions when wearing it. So if you want to be a jerk at McDonalds, leave the camo at home. When you are wearing camo, you are identified as a hunter regardless if it is in June. You cut someone off at the intersection and flip them the bird.....you were not anonymous, you were a hunter.

A lot of people in my church hunt and I get bombarded with "How did you do?" after deer season.
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby Magic » 01 13, 2020 •  [Post 8]

This topic is a bit old but our deer season is still in full swing. We have an archery target shoot followed by a Wild Game Supper at our church each year after our hunting seasons close. Primos and several other hunting/outdoor outlets donate door prizes and everyone gets something. There is usually over 100 people present.
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby wawhitey » 01 13, 2020 •  [Post 9]

7mmfan wrote:As hunters we absolutely need to represent ourselves as the face of the hunting population. I'm with you Swede, I rarely run into staunch anti hunters. People usually have no exposure to hunting and their only knowledge is assumptions or what they've read online or been told by others. Usually after a couple drinks and a thoughtful co conversation backed up by facts and data points, people walk away with an entirely different point of view. Case in point, my wife's cousin is vegan. Not an in your face, talks about it constantly vegan, but vegan none the less. One Christmas I was asked how hunting season went and proudly talked about the bull and buck I'd killed. She made a passing comment about how we would all be better off not eating meat at all, and how killing is cruel. Her, most of the extended family, and I ended up having an hour long talk about conservatiom and herd management, as well as my hunt plans, meat care and processing, and end goal of a freezer full of organic free range meat to feed my family with. Now her and her husband are champions of hunting, even though they're still vegan. Just took a well thought out discussion to turn them.



Now i know youre lying, no such thing exists. :lol:
Real eyes realize real lies
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby Tigger » 01 14, 2020 •  [Post 10]

When I teach firearm safety, I tell my students that wearing camo makes you a hunter no matter if you are hunting or not. Bud in line at McDonalds wearing camo and you are not an anonymous person, you are a hunter budding in line. It is the hunter's uniform and when you wear it, represent us well.

I then say, I am not telling you not to be a jerk, I am simply telling you when you are, don't wear camo! Usually that gets the parents in attendance to roll their eyes.
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby Magic » 01 14, 2020 •  [Post 11]

I like that !! ;)

Nothing to do with jerk or no jerk, but I personally dislike seeing camo worn anywhere in everyday life.
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby Swede » 01 28, 2020 •  [Post 12]

This is somewhat different from where the thread was going, but have you ever considered that what we think about wildlife management and hunting is heavily influenced on where we live and our lifestyle? If I live in the inner city and the only wildlife I see are roaches, pigeons and rats; the thought of a place with an abundance of wolves and grizzly bears sounds quite romantic.
They read about such things in a book. Who hasn't dreamt of floating down the Mississippi River on a raft with Huckleberry Finn? It is the same thing. I can kick back with a good book and dream of camping out in the high country and hearing wolves howl and elk bugle. Vicariously I can go on some great adventures and see a world totally different from the inner city or even the suburbs packed with people.
Does anyone think we could talk these people into supporting the elimination of these great creatures from the wild? Personally I hated to see the wolver introduced into the lower States, but I think management of them is the best we can hope for now. Just my thought.
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Re: An Elk Hunter In Church

Postby 7mmfan » 01 29, 2020 •  [Post 13]

You are 100% correct. Lifestyle, upbringing and where you live absolutely plays a roll in your view of wildlife and wildlife management. I had an interesting experience just last week at a meeting with my sales team. My boss, who is in his mid 60's, very down to earth guy, but born and raised in Portland, still lives there, and has had virtually no real outdoor experience. I'm the only guy in our 10 person team that hunts or fishes. I bring jerky to all our meetings, and everyone loves it. They get a kick out of how woodsy I am and that I kill and process my own meat. When asked what kind of meat the last batch of jerky was, I told them elk, and that I'd bring some bear summer sausage to the next meeting. My boss looked at me in udder disbelief, and told me he couldn't believe I would kill a bear. I started the conversation about quality bear meat, how good it is, no different than other game meat, and that bears are a predator that needs to be managed that just like any other game animal. His words verbatim, "I just think it's weird that someone would kill a bear, I mean, it's a bear."

People who haven't been raised around it or exposed to it in a meaningful way have a predisposition to cute and cuddly bears, wolves, and cats. They aren't traditional game that everyone knows gets hunted, so in their mind, it's completely distasteful to kill these animals.

I have had mixed results trying to get people to understand predator management. Some, after a well thought out conversation get the concept, and may agree begrudgingly, most won't.

On the topic of your last sentence, we will never eradicate wolves in the lower 48, they are here to stay. Management is the best we can hope for.
I hunt therefore I am. I fish therefore I lie.
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